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The Susan G. Komen Houston chapter – established in 1990 – is hosting the 26th annual Susan G. Komen Houston Race for the Cure on Saturday, Oct. 1. The money raised from the fundraiser will help fund programs all across the seven-county region surrounding Houston that makes up the chapter’s footprint. The Houston chapter serves Brazoria, Chambers, Fort Bend, Galveston, Harris, Liberty and Montgomery counties.

According to its literature, “75 percent of the funds raised stay right here in Houston to support education programs, mammograms, patient navigation, treatment and support groups provided by the local health organizations it funds, and 25 percent of the funds go to vital breast cancer research on a national level, but with a large, state-of-the-art Medical Center in the heart of the city, many of those research grants end up coming back to Houston.”

This is why participation and involvement in the Race for the Cure is so crucial. The race is the top fundraising event for the local Susan G. Komen chapter.

Leading each team to victory are Susan G. Komen Houston team captains.

Team captains are expected to recruit team members, and coach their team’s fundraising for the affiliate’s annual Race for the Cure;utilize creative thinking to invent ways to help raise funds throughout the year; act as Komen Houston representatives by distributing breast health/breast cancer awareness information and represent their hometowns and counties at Komen-hosted events. The organization motivates team captains by holding contests for fundraising goals and runner participation. Last week, Komen announced winners who had increased their team size the most.

This year’s Team Captain winners included Tiffany Dent, Lead Surgical nurse with the Pearland Proud N Pink team at Pearland Medical Center.

Ms. Dent said she became involved in the event this year “because there is an unbelievable need for support of all kinds: from raising awareness, to providing funding for treatment, and beyond.”

“We all have someone who has been affected by breast cancer,” said Dent . “At Pearland Medical Center , this disease hits home especially hard because we have had coworkers , close relatives, and friends diagnosed with this chronic disease.”

In 2016 alone, more than 240,000 women and 2,600 men are expected to be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. And this year in the U.S., at least 40,000 breast cancer victims will die.